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20100901
20100930
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KPIX (CBS) 15
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invasion that left jennifer hawke-petit and daughters haley and michaela dead. that followed a week of chill i video of jennifer's last minutes alive. and grueling testimony of william petit, the lone survivor. >> we have a lot of support. like to thank friends and people from all over the state and the country for their notes and texts and e-mails. they've been very supportive. >> reporter: petit addressed reporters outside court. >> we're happy with the way the prosecution is presenting its case and things are moving along at a reasonable pace. >> reporter: the prosecution's case turned to photographs of the petit's torched home that told the tale of torture and murder. cynthia is jennifer's sister. >> we have lived with this for over three years and we did walk through the house a long time ago so those images really stay in your mind even though they wish they could leave. >> reporter: pictures of fire ravaged bedrooms, cords still tied to bed posts that prosecutors say were used to restrain the petit daughters, both girls died of smoke inhalation. >> what that does is really pu
stuff. we're going to do that with rebecca jarvis, dr. jennifer ashton and jennifer hartstein here as well in just a few minutes. >>> also ahead this morning, if you're moving long distance, ever done it, you know it is a nightmare, but it can be more than that. it can be a scam. one price on the phone, when the truck shows up, they double or triple the price. susan koeppen will tell us a mover who did that from noin fr our hidden cameras. we'll talk about that. >> now to the newsdesk. >> good morning, everyone. >>> southern florida is on flood alert. a soaking tropical depression making it's way up the coffee at 35 miles per hour. our miami station wfor joins us with the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, erica. in south florida, they're getting quite the soaking. myself, i'm actually wading in ankle-deep water. we're here on miami beach. when you have the constant do downpours the concern is flooding. that is what is giving motorists quite a bit of trouble making their way through. of course, that's something to be cautious about. in preparation for this storm, wate
it. you have a 50/50 chance of being infected. jennifer isn't worried. so it wouldn't stop you? >> no. it wouldn't stop me, no. unless i had a big huge thing in my arm then i would stop. >> reporter: it's the only place in california where the japanese bubble snail is found. if you got the rash while swimming at crown beach, there is not a lot you can do about it. but wait a few days and it will be gone. at crown beach, don ford, cbs 5. >>> a new approach to helping struggling home owners, that's in two minutes. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, the agency is one of three in th s trying out >>> caltrain is experimenting with a new plan to cut down on suicides. the agency is one of three in the country trying out these new signs. they are on a 10-mile stretch between menlo park and mountain view. the difference with these signs is that the phone numbers do not spell out the words like help or suicide. >> it isn't necessarily easy to find the word help on a cell phone when it hasn't got the letters ton. >> the number and type of calls will be tracked. this will be the first time in the united st
home owners jittery about some potential scams. jennifer mistrot about how neighbors can make sure that contractors spotted in the area are supposed to be there. >>> reporter: the residents of this san bruno neighborhood evacuated after last week's gas explosion are back in their homes. they have been greeted by signs, warning about contractor fraud. >> you know, when they first approached me, i was a little leary because they were anxious to get in and started cleaning. >> reporter: he lives near the blast site. he thinks his house sustained minimal damage. but inside reeks of smoke so everything needs to be washed from the walls right down to the dishes in his kitchen cupboard. it's a big job. >> i'm sort of consistently asking the policemen, hey, what are the rules and regulations of letting people in? because they are not letting a lot of people in. so since these restoration and cleaning folks have been let in, does that mean they're on the up and up? >> i was in the neighborhood today and -- >> reporter: pg&e wants to make sure all contractors working to restore this neighbor
be a reason why men and women are so different. and our dr. jennifer ashton will be along to explain. >> sorry. >>> also coming up -- he is closing in on 80 years of age, but william shatner has just become captain of a new enterprise. >> clever. >> very funny. i didn't write it but i'll take credit for it. a funny sitcom called "bleep my dad says" and he'll tell us all about that in a bit. >>> 8:01. time to take you back inside to erica hill at the newsdesk. >> good morning everyone at home. a new book by bob woodward painting a serious series of conflict in the obama white house. all over strategy for the war in afghanistan. according to the "washington post," the book "obama's wars" the president has a plan for how we're going to hand it off and get out of afghanistan. he never got one. finally decided on a short-term escalation involving 30,000 american troops saying, i'm not doing ten year, long-term nation building. i am not sending $1 trillion. >>> and court resumes in connecticut in the brutal triple murder case. betty nguyen has been covering it and joins us from new haven with the la
cans to improve your stress and balance like our dr. jennifer ashton is demonstrating. we're going to talk to her ahead about what else you can do. >> also ahead this morning, it took years for society to slowly isolate or ban smokers from restaurants, right, and from airplanes. now it's sort of, you would never expect to see a smoker in there, right? some people are equating families with small children, misbehaving children, not our children, maggie. >> of course not. >> as the new smokers. the new sort of persona non grata would be the screaming child in a restaurant. a lot of people might agree with it. but should they be banned from public places or even from airplanes as some people have suggested. >> or have a separate section. >> that has been another theory. we're going to talk about that this morning with our dr. jennifer hartstein who is here with some tips for all of us to live a little more peacefully together. >> i see dave nod being emphatically. if they were banning your dog wally who you take everywhere would you be as excited about this? >> first of all, wally doe
dr. jennifer hartstein she's a child and adolescent psychologist. >> good morning. >> 400% increase in the last 10 years. why do you think it's been so dramatic? >> it's an incredibly huge increase. i think there's ease of use. >> easy access like the girl said. >> it's in your house, your medicine cabinet. you don't have to seek it out. you can hide it more. the signs aren't there, so the parents can know what you're doing. >> what's also scary, kids are younger and younger. kids as young as 12 years old doing that. >> 12 and older. >> if your kid smokes you can smell the smoke. if your kid drinks you can see they are drunk. if they abuse prescription drugs, how can you tell? >> it's harder. talking about feeling hot, maybe they are nauseous eyes are red, nose running, lethargic, trouble in school. some of the signs are the same. it's much harder to look for. you have to look in your cabinets and see what's going on. >> not just cabinets. aren't there other hot spots. >> medicine cabinet. kitchen, households appliances. garages, they are using inhalan
study that now says testing women in their 40s would reduce the risk of dying by 26%. dr. jennifer ashton will help us sort it out. >>> also ahead, what do lady gaga and the dall lay lla dall common? they're both on twitter along with about 100 million other people around the world. we'll have to twitter how-to lesson and show you why celebrities in particular love tweeting. >>> but first, we want to get the latest on that big storm all up and down the east coast today. dave price is in wilmington, north carolina. good morning, dave. >> good morning to you, maggie. this is what happens when you get 20 plus inches of rain over four or five days in a row. there's just nowhere for this water to go. and that's the big concern throughout north carolina and, indeed, up and down much of the mid atlantic states as we head through the next 24 hours. right now we broken all sorts of records. you can see the storm system combines the remnants of tropical storm nicole and low pressure system. as a result, a lot of moisture rolling up the eastern seaboard now severe weather is a tlit as well. t
, what do you think is the answer for dealing with distracted driving? jennifer says... "ther 't >> send your answers to mornings@cbs5.com. or you can post your answers on our facebook page. we're also on twitter. we'll share your responses. >>> overpaid and in jail. the new obstacle for city leaders in bell. >>> plus, it's three -- [overlapping speakers] >> and another morning that killers here at san quentin have the opportunity to be alive. we'll tell you the latest in the legal wrangling that is keeping albert brown alive this morning. coming up. >> all right. thanks, anne. plus, it's 3-d and no glasses are required. whether nintendo's new gaming device will be out in time for christmas. >>> love super mario brothers. all right. chp work it would go pretty big accidents right now in the east bay including one where traffic is backed up close to half a mile. we'll tell you where that is coming up. ,, ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it's a universal gesture... ♪ a way of telling the world "you did it!"... without saying a word. introducing the mercedes-benz sls...amg. [ engine revs ] ♪
they are in custody. their next court date is september 23. in san bruno, jennifer mistrot, cbs 5. >>> those devastated by the explosion are now sifting through the burned-out rubble. their homes, their treasured keepsakes, wiped out in a tragic instant. but while there is little left to salvage, anne makovec shows us from these ashes hope emerges. >> reporter: it's not worth saving but we did anyway. >>> reporter: the only decipherable items left over from their three-bedroom home now fit in this box. >> like there are baseball cards in here and so i don't know why we took this. but we did. or an old yearbook, something like that. >> reporter: one week after the gas explosion decimated their neighborhood, the family suited up in hazmat gear to sift through the rubble that was once their home on glenview drive. >> it's like --it's kind of like going to, i don't know, a cemetery. just everything was dead, you know? no life left to it. >> reporter: what was that life, -- what was that like, the digging through rubble? >> it kind of felt like, you know, i don't know, like you weren't going to a
of soda every day can tack on as much as 15 pounds in one year. our dr. jennifer ashton will be along with the results of a new study on which beverages are best and worse for your children. >>> every father's warning to his daughter's boyfriend, don't even think about it. well, one father in california may have taken that warning too farp. he's a police officer. he pretended to arrest a teen-aged boy who he believed had gone too far with his step-daughter and then decided to take action. we'll have that story, too. >> first, at 7:30, the latest on amanda knox currently serving 26 years in an italian prison for murdering her roommate. but this week, she'll be back in court fighting off the possibility of even more jail time on a different charge. we'll speak with her mother exclusively about this in just a moment. her mother, edda mellas, also faces jail time for the same charge but first our national correspondent jeff glor is here with the details. jeff, good morning. >> good morning to you. ten months after convicted of murder 23-year-old seattle native amanda knox will face an ita
gates joins us now along with dr. jennifer ashton. good morning. >> hi. >> as i became aware of this story, i knew that you were going to come in to chat with us, i'm going to ask questions that may sound dumb. do you remember being here last summer? >> yes, yeah. >> i'm curious. you are a person we can have a real conversation about, about having a stroke and the effects of that. >> yeah. >> did you come to after you were hospitalized, your brain is working? >> when i first got into the car with my girlfriends, they asked me to write the alphabet. i could only get up to the letter "l." then i don't remember anything after that. and when my doctor -- the doctor you saw, i was in the hospital, and he was asking me to touch my ear and my nose. i couldn't do it. >> you didn't know what they were. remarkable that you have to literally rebuild your brain basically from scratch. >> it was fascinating process. >> that's an interesting way of putting it. was it arduous? >> yes. it was hard. it was hard. >> even now, though, do you -- are you symptom-free? or are there longer lasting
of foodborne disease we see every year. jennifer ashton is here with more. disgust. one out of seven kitchens wouldn't pass the test. that was conservative, they said. it is probably worse in reality. >> precisely why i stay out of my own kitchen. but in actuality, erica, there are number of foodborne illnesses every year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 estimated deaths due to foodborne illness. this is not an insignificant issue. >> it is ear just. actually a number of them also go unreported. numbers could be potentially higher. >> absolute. >> i what is it? where's the germiest, grimeiest, most bacteria laden spots in the kitchen we need to clean up? >> anywhere that you put your hands from the second you walk in your kitchen. remember, you can potentially bring germs into your kitchen before you start cutting. anywhere from the faucet and sink to the refrigerator and to the stove handles and everywhere. but these are really the biggest hotspots and start really with what we use to clean our kitchen which is are sponge. >> can i just say this is a plea to everyone, don't u
. by then it was too late to save jennifer hawke-petit and her two daughters. the delay raises the question did the small-town force have the training and resources to save the victims? joining us to talk it over oh, bill stat ton, private investigators and former new york city police officer. good to have you with us. >> thank you. >> i just want to hear your side of this, your feelings. as a former police officer this has to bother you tremendously at the response time was as long as it was for something like . >> this is well, absolutely. but first, let's say, these two gentlemen are evil personified. forotdefense to make the allegation that somehow the police department's fault this actually happened, you know, that's horrendous, out of the question. but, there are a lot of questions that need to be asked and answered. >> do you think it is just as simple as it is cheshire, an affluent town in connecticut, they don't have resources although you would think with the taxes people pay they would but not have the training or not know how to respond to a quote/unquote big city crime like this? >
john gilbride and our other own dr. jennifer ashton. good to see both of you. >> good morning. >> what is it about this and why is the dea doing it now. >> well, when you look at the numbers, it's staggering in terms of the number of people that are abusing prescription drugs. seven million people abuse prescription drugs a 13% increase in just one year. when you look at the number of teenagers that are abusing prescription drugs, it's frightening. 2500 teens, on average, every day use prescription drugs to get high for the very first time. so, operation takeback is a chance to get those drugs out of the medicine cabinet where they're just sitting there waiting to be abused. >> jen, as a doctor, how rampant is the abuse that you see in your own office and what is the seriousness of it? because i think a lot of people miss that point this all of this. >> well, i think we don't really know how rampant it is. those numbers we just saw are just really estimates and the fear in medicine, clinical medicine, this key even be worse. i think a lot of people fall in the habit of use, abuse and d
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15